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Cracked Concrete Wall

BESPOKE FRAMING

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Edward Taylor GCF, Managing Director 

     We believe it is essential that our customers have the best possible advice and information so that they have a clear set of options from which to make a decision. We can also offer advice on colours and textures to enhance the image and co-ordinate with where it will hang. We want our customers to feel confident in us and to enjoy coming to our shop. The majority of items brought in for framing are artworks in various mediums on paper, board or canvas. However, we have experience in framing a multitude of objects of every size and shape including medals, clothing (shirts, caps, bodices, shoes, etc.), needle work, porcelain, coins, stamps, papyrus, leather, spoons and many other 3D items. Over time we have developed procedures for framing these items. Occasionally we get something new and enjoy the challenge of planning the best solution. Our ultimate aim is to have happy and satisfied customers.

Framing Techniques

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Double Mount Frame

As per the Single Mount Spec with a secondary mount placed underneath with an overlap of usually 5mm.

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Single Mount Frame

The most common way of displaying your images. The idea of a mount is to lift the glass away from the image to stop them interacting over time.

This method is used primarily for paper products as the standard depth of a mount 1.4mm.

As per standard we nip into the image area by at least 3mm so that there is a nice clean edge and that if any atmospheric conditions cause the paper to expand and contract the edge is not visible.

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Single Mount Ltd Edition or A/p Frame

Single Mount framing, however, we look to have a suitable size white space between the image and the mount to make sure that the signatures and edition numbers are visible.

The counter to this is that atmospherics can cause the image to expand or contract and we therefore need to ensure that edge does not become visible.

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Extra Thick Double Mount Frame

As per the Double Mount Spec, however, the secondary mount placed underneath has a depth of between 2-3mm over the usual 1.4mm. This is then step an overlap of usually 7mm.

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Close Frame 

This is the simplest method of framing, however, it does have a number of technical issues and would urge you to consider using a mount to lift the glass away from the image.

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Mount Slip Frame 

This is a decorative addition to a single mount method.

 

It is a great way to add secondary splash of the frame colour. Or add some more traditional gilt colours.

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Shirt Frame 

The shirt is sewn over a mountboard for a natural look. this is then sewn into a box made from mount board and foam for strength. We also place a shadow mount which gives a lovely 3D shadow and really enhances the frame.

 

This method needs a frame which is deep enough to cover the box.

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Wooden Spacer Frame 

This is a great method to add depth to your frame.

 

Not only is it extremely effective on paper prints it is a great way to frame 3D objects.

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Shirt Frame With Spacer

The shirt is sewn over a mount board for a natural look and then placed in a spacer frame to keep the shirt away from the glass.

 

This is a slimmer method of the shirt frame and can only be used on very thin shirts that do not have a high collar.

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Wooden Slip

This is the traditional technique for lifting the glass away from the image. It allows for a much thinner edge than a mount board and is a great look when any wood grain is needed to enhance the piece.

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Surface Mount With Spacer

This method allows the edge of the paper to be visible within the frame and has the added depth of the spacer this is a great method to use on products that have some 3D elements, e.g. beads, added acrylic, 3d laser cuts, etc...

 

We attach the image to the sub mount using water reversable archival paper.

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This method allows the edge of the paper to be visible within the frame and also to be kept away from the glass so that it doesn't interact with it over time.

 

We attach the image to the sub mount using water reversable archival paper.

Surface Mount

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Floating Surface Mount

This method allows the edge of the paper to be visible and for it to appear to float inside the frame.

 

We attach the image to the sub mount using water reversable archival paper.

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This method is primarily used for items like papyrus and is often the way they are displayed in the country of origin.

Papyrus being a heavier stiffer material that is prone to cockling is better directly under glass. The beading is a more decorative way to finish of the frame and is used for those frames that will be viewed often.

We would not recommend this for a normal paper product due to the interaction it can have with the glass.

Papyrus Glass Back & Front

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Paper Image with Glass Back & Front 

This method allows the edge of the paper to be visible and for it to appear to float inside the frame.

 

We attach the image to the sub mount using water reversable archival paper.

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Paper Image with Glass Back & Front 

With Beading Frame

This method is primarily used for items like papyrus and is often the way they are displayed in the country of origin.

Papyrus being a heavier stiffer material that is prone to cockling is better directly under glass.

We would not recommend this for a normal paper product due to the interaction it can have with the glass.

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Canvas On Stretcher Bars 

The canvas is stretched over canvas bars and then placed within a frame which is deep enough to cover the edge of the canvas.

 

Glass is not normally used as the canvas should be varnished by the artist.

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Canvas Board Frame 

The canvas is stretched over aboard and then placed within a frame.

We would recommend using the stretcher bars over this method.

Glass is not normally used as the canvas should be varnished by the artist.

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Canvas Tray Frame 

The canvas is stretched over canvas bars and then placed within an L shaped frame which is deep enough to cover the edge of the canvas.

 

Glass is not normally used as the canvas should be varnished by the artist.

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Using internal stretcher bars we take the canvas and pin the canvas to the side of the bars with a good tension.

 

This is the method we use to stretch the canvas before it is placed in a frame, this allows us to get the maximum image area.

Oil Painting Canvas Stretching Over Bars

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Canvas Wrap

Using internal stretcher bars we take the canvas to the rear and pin the canvas to a good tension and hospital corners.

 

The fittings are then placed on the back so that it is ready to hang on the wall without an outside frame.

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Hand Stitched Fine Textiles

This is one of the most labour intensive methods, we firstly sew the fine textiles to a canvas then stretch it over bars allowing room for fillets or mounts to lift the glass away.

 

This method mean that only the canvas (Acid neutral material) touches the textile and that it is stretched evenly. It can also be restretch at a later stage.